Halloween

Halloween
5% of All Sales go to Support The Tavern

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

What Mapping Program(s) Do You Use?

As you can see from my earlier posts today, I've been enjoying playing around with Other World Mapper. It simply does what it says it can do and the learning curve is small.

I've tried to use many versions of Campaign Cartographer and it is simply way beyond my ability to understand. It's not that I do poor maps with it, I just can't do ANY maps with it.

Hexographer is great for hex maps. It does what it says it will do. I'm looking for a different look with the map I'm currently toying with, but I'd certainly use Hexographer again.

Those are the ones I have the most experience with.

Of course, this question is asking about outdoor and setting maps, but what do you use for your dungeon maps? I know I can do them with Other World Mapper, but options and ideas are always a great thing.




22 comments:

  1. I use Campaign Cartographer (w/Dungeon Designer, City Designer, Perspectives, Character Artist, & Cosmographer add-ons) exclusively. I've never found it difficult to use, but that's because I slavishly follow the Tutorials Profantasy includes...have you tried those? I found them to be super-helpful in learning how to make the software do what I want it to.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is not nearly as nice as Hexographer, but I still prefer using GIMP with a plugin. Hexgrid for GIMP

    ReplyDelete
  3. I use hexographer. I like the ease of use.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It turns out there are plans for a Hexographer II coming soon to kickstarter.

      Delete
  4. For dungeon maps, these days I'm using Sketchup to make a perspective reference, which I print and draw on with pencil, then ink; I then scan it back into Photoshop for cleanup. For wilderness maps, it's all Photoshop.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I used CorelDRAW, but I'd only recommend that if you can devote the time to play with the software. If you are having problems with Hexographer, you might find it a little daunting. Still, I find it great for emulating a a number of particular styles.

    Does Hexographer have video tutorials? Maybe start there if you are trying to do somethign specific.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I've tried CC, Fractal Mapper, Hexographer, and a few dungeon mapping applications I don't even remember the name of. I don't have anything really negative to say about them (except for CC's price... yikes...), and each of them do things very well.

    After I stopped looking for miracle mapping programs that will allow me to create great looking maps with my very limited artistic ability, I became much happier. These days I mostly map in Inkscape (for overland maps) and with pen/paper (dungeon and town). I can barely draw a stick figure, but with the proper patience and emulation of better cartographers than myself, I've been creating maps that I'm so much happier with than my time spent in mapping programs.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I use MS paint and a blank graphpaper jpg.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I thought everyone in the OSR was still required to use graph paper their parents brought home from work.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I have had great luck with Inkarnate. It's an online map painting tool that you hardly need any drawing skill to get some amazing effects. It's especially great for creating world maps. They are still in beta, but check them out at http://inkarnate.com/

    ReplyDelete
  10. For dungeon maps I tend to use the Dyson Mapper as it come out looking incredible and hand drawn. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, often starting with pencil and pen then scanning. I have used Campaign Cartographer in the past, I bought CC1 ages ago and upgraded through both CC2 and CC3, but I don't get the same satisfaction from using it as I do when I hand draw my map and scan it, or use my custom brushes (scanned from hand drawn elements) in Photoshop.

    Bear in mind that I use Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign on a daily basis for my primary job, so that makes it somewhat easier for me to work with.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I just found Textmapper:

    https://campaignwiki.org/text-mapper/

    It takes a text description of a hex field and makes the map for you - no fuss, no muss. The "random" button there generates a field based on the Welsh Piper's random terrain generation tables from way back.

    You can put your own icons in (SVG, many options available) change colors, etc. It's good stuff, and frees you from drawing/redrawing/reredrawing as you change things - or - simply by commenting out lines in the text file you can hide hexes from a player facing map, or grow the map as they explore - on demand, just-in-time mapping.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I draw maps with pencil on plain paper or graph paper as appropriate, sometimes using a ruler or compass. No-one other than me ever sees the map – so why spend time on what it looks like? Some maps are seen by players (e.g. a city overview or wilderness), but I still do them with pencil (albeit a little more carefully) so they can be added to or annotated during play. The thing I do put a lot of effort into is props such as treasure maps, which can be really effective.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I use Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. Like Anthony above I've been using them professionally for years so it only makes sense I use them on maps as well.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Generally I tend to hand draw my maps then scan them and color them with GIMP. I have used campaign Cartographer a bit, but I agree that It's pretty labor intensive. For my most successful Campaign Cartographer effort, I actually ended up scanning a hand drawn coastal outline and then importing it into CC because I had such a hard time drawing the coastline within the tool itself. My results were decidedly mixed as can be seen here: http://jrl755.blogspot.com/2015/01/updated-sungor-map.html

    ReplyDelete
  17. I use Campaign Cartographer a lot, especially for colored overland maps, but for simple hex or dungeon maps I use Hexographer/Dungeonographer.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I use CC3 as well, and the Fractal Terrains

    https://www.facebook.com/CartographyOfThane/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

    ReplyDelete
  19. I use Inkscape (a free alternative to Illustrator) to create most of my maps. I might do some final tweaking in GIMP but the heavy lifting is done in Inkscape.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I use CC3+ for most maps, Hexographer for some and still use Dungeon Crafter on occasion.

    ReplyDelete